living her best life #44: the facts…

Spoke with Pat while they waited for their flight home from Minnesota. In speaking with her, I got a lot of good information about what’s in store for her when she returns to the Mayo Clinic in a month or so. It prompted me to delve a little further into what had been a total mystery to me. I knew a little bit about multiple myeloma, but not all the scientific mumbo jumbo. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in saying…I didn’t want to know everything. I was too afraid of what I might find out. Pat’s call gave me the shove I needed to go looking.

The website for The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation was just what I was looking for to shed some light on Pat’s disease. Of all that I read, the following were of significance to me, as I’m sure it will be to the majority of my sister-in-law’s loved ones, near and far.

Multiple Myeloma is a Treatable Cancer

Multiple myeloma treatment options have increased significantly over the last 10 years. New multiple myeloma treatments have resulted in improved survival rates among myeloma patients. Even more encouraging, there are many promising new therapies under investigation now. We are not just accelerating the development of the next treatment, but by seeking to customize treatments based on our mapping of a patient’s genome, we are accelerating the development of the right treatment for each patient who urgently needs it.

The importance of genomics
One area researchers are working on is better understanding the biology of multiple myeloma. Through genomic studies (studies of the tumor cell DNA), we have learned that there are many DNA alterations in myeloma cells, and these frequently differ from patient to patient. The ultimate goal of genomic research is to develop personalized treatments based on the DNA in the myeloma cells of individual patients. These frequently differ from patient to patient. There is not one set of defining alterations.

Today, we know that certain DNA alterations indicate how aggressive the myeloma is and, in some cases, test results can help guide treatment decisions or determine eligibility for multiple myeloma clinical trials.

DNA alterations and treatment
For most DNA alterations, there are not enough data to guide treatment decisions. An exception is t(4;14). This is one of a type of chromosomal abnormalities called translocation in which a chromosome breaks and a portion of it reattaches to a different chromosome.

Studies have shown that patients with t(4;14) have better outcomes when treated with a proteasome inhibitor, such as Velcade.

Factors determining treatment
There is no one standard multiple myeloma treatment. A patient’s individual treatment plan is based on a number of things, including:

Age and general health
Results of laboratory and cytogenetic (genomic) tests
Symptoms and disease complications
Prior myeloma treatment
Patient’s lifestyle, goals, views on quality of life, and personal preferences

In addition, many cancer centers have developed their own guidelines for treating myeloma, and these may vary between centers.

Stem Cell Transplants

What are stem cell transplants?

A stem cell transplant, in combination with high dose chemotherapy, is a treatment that offers a chance for durable remission of multiple myeloma. High-dose chemotherapy, though effective in killing myeloma cells, also destroys normal blood-forming cells, called hematopoeitic stem cells, in the bone marrow. Stem cell transplantation replaces these important cells.

Hematopoeitic stem cells are normally found in the bone marrow and in the peripheral blood (blood found in the arteries or veins). Virtually all transplants in myeloma are now obtained from the blood and are referred to as peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplants. Bone marrow transplants are no longer done in multiple myeloma. Stem cells are collected after approximately four cycles of initial (induction) myeloma therapy in order to reduce the amount of myeloma cells. Medications that stimulate the production of stem cells (called mobilizing) are often given to ensure collection of sufficient stem cells for several transplants.

All patients who are eligible for transplantation are encouraged to have stem cells obtained (also known as “harvested”) so that the cells are available if the patient chooses to undergo transplantation at some point during the course of their disease.Stem cell transplants are categorized by the source of stem cells: allogeneic stem cells or autologous stem cells.

Common side effects of high-dose chemotherapy and transplantation include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mucositis (inflammation of the lining of the mouth and digestive tract), and fatigue. In addition, because the high-dose chemotherapy attacks healthy, disease-fighting cells as well as cancerous cells, there is an increased risk of infection. Other possible, but infrequent side effects may include organ damage, particularly to the lungs, liver, and kidneys.

…okay then…so now i know.

………hugmamma.

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2 thoughts on “living her best life #44: the facts…

hugs for sharing some brief thoughts...and keeping them positive

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