living her best life: #48…let’s do this!

That’s what Pat’s been saying for some time now.

“Let’s do this.”

And so she is.

Hi [hugmamma.]  We are doing good.

The first day here was a whole bunch of tests…the worst of it being the bone marrow biopsy. No pain afterwards just a little discomfort. We were at the clinic all day from 7:30 until 4:30 and that was after arriving at the Transplant House at about 2:30 a.m. Needless to say we were both dead tired.

The 2nd day started at 7:30 again and ended at about 5 with visit with an oral surgeon. I get to have teeth pulled! [hugmamma here…Pat’s molars have not been properly aligned for some time now which has impeded her chewing food properly, which has contributed to her rapid weight loss.] Because they are loose and roots exposed, there is a great risk of infection after the transplant so they got to go. I was thinking what else can I get fixed while I’m here? We also got a little tour of the area where they do the stem cell collection and got an education on that whole process and on diet and nutrition after the transplant.

Today was a short day…a meeting with the transplant coordinator and with Dr. Hertz. Everything still looks good and we are moving forward. We have nothing scheduled for the next 5 days (paperwork between Kaiser and Mayo) so we’ll have time to just relax, get used to living in the transplant house and give Brad a crash course on how to turn on a stove! So far so good…Applebee’s is not too far away.

It’d be great if you continued the blog…when you have time. I’m also going to set up a web page where everyone can check on what’s going on. I’ll send you the link before I invite everyone else. 

Living in the house so far has been good. Others here are very helpful…it takes a little getting used to sharing the kitchen space with others. We have to get over feeling like we are guests in some one else’s kitchen. We made our own breakfast for the first time today. Only down side is I can’t just grab a cookie and sit on the couch…no food outside of dining areas…drinks are okay. Brad is doing okay with chores so far because I’m able to help. Gotta get him comfortable in the kitchen…shouldn’t be too hard. Will be heading to Trader Joe’s later today.

Spoke to the boys a few times. They seem to be doing okay. Planning to “face time” with them on Sunday. Maybe I can get them to show me what the house looks like, or maybe I don’t want to know. 

…love and prayers, pat and brad…from all of us.

………hugmamma.

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living her best life #47: counting down…

…until I’m home again. That’s what’s foremost in Pat’s mind, having touched down in Rochester, Minnesota only 48 hours or so ago.

After spending a couple of days with my husband and me sightseeing in and around Seattle and its environs, Pat and Brad headed to The Mayo Clinic where they will now spend the next month-and-a-half. To get them off on the right foot, so to speak, we were intent upon wining and dining them and making them smile and laugh until they were exhausted, falling into bed…happy as clams tucked snugly into their shells for the night. And I mean snugly since they insisted on sharing the vintage double bed in our former master bedroom suite-turned- guest suite. They opted not to share our daughter’s queen-size bed, probably because they knew she’d be enroute home the day they left.

Arriving from Honolulu where they reside Sunday evening, we drove to a casual waterfront restaurant where I’d made reservations for us to celebrate Father’s Day. Dining outdoors on the deck was like being in Hawaii, the sun beating down without letup. While the others weren’t bothered by the heat, I almost followed through on the server’s suggestion to check out their souvenir shop for visors. Instead I decided that if Pat could withstand the sun’s rays, so could I. If there’s one thing I’ve since learned from her it’s not to be a wuss.

On Monday we traveled into Seattle from where we live in the suburbs to visit the Chihuly Museum. Pat had asked to see it, and like her fairy godparents, my husband and I wanted to grant her wish. Even though we’d been there before, we did not need to be asked twice to return to the museum again. For those unfamiliar with master glass blower Chihuly, he has become a global phenomenon because of the glass structures he has created to mimic the beauty found in nature. His museum is not to be missed. In fact, seeing it again my husband and I were once more awed by how the outdoor gardens had matured around Chihuly’s glass creations.

Following our tour of the glass museum, we lunched in the Sky Cafe high atop Seattle’s  landmark Space Needle. When asked if she’d prefer…a great view and good food…or great food and a good view…Pat said she wasn’t aware there was a restaurant at the top of the Space Needle. I’m sure she’d agree, the view AND the food were awesome. While dining, the restaurant did 2-3 revolutions showing us all of Seattle a couple of times over as we sat enjoying our meal. Afterwards, we stepped out onto the Observation Deck one level above to enjoy the gentle breezes of the outdoors while gazing down at the rooftops of the myriad buildings below.

Before leaving the city, we headed to Seattle Center’s huge fountain, an attraction for old and young alike…adults chilling while children frolic in the water cascading down from on high after being shot into the air as though from a cannon. Again, Pat remained in the scorching heat with the men as wimpy me sought comfort under the canopy of trees offering shelter from the afternoon sun. Oh well. I am a decade older than my sister-in-law so maybe I can claim old age as an excuse.

To round out a wonderful day, we enjoyed a casual meal at a Japanese restaurant closer to home. It’s always nice to visit with our nephew Kanoa and his wife Erica. The evening was made even more special by their beguiling 6-month-old, Luca. He literally charmed the pants off of all of us…well, at least mine.

When we sent Pat and Brad on their way the next day, it was with armfuls of love and prayers. And I know they’ll continue to need as much from all of us as they prepare for what lies ahead.

…love and prayers, pat and brad.

………hugmamma

facing our demons…

When I was a child growing up in Wailuku on the sleepy island of Maui, I sometimes wished I could attend Sunday service at the Jehovah Witnesses Hall near my family’s rented house. Walking past the Hall on my way to buy a few things at the grocery store, I could hear the members singing. Unlike the solemnity of my own Catholic church, the Jehovah Witnesses sounded like they were having a blast. What I wouldn’t have given to sing my heart out just like those folks. 

While I never thought twice about what the Jehovah witnesses looked like, I assumed they were blacks. Why? Because of pictures I’d seen on TV and in print of blacks smiling and clapping their hands as they sang their prayers to God. I wanted to be like them. Still do.

I believe in a joyful God, one who focuses upon goodness. One who overlooks our flaws, knowing we will improve…if we want to improve. 

This morning as I watched CNN news, I wished I was sitting among the parishioners of the church where 9 blacks had been gunned down. 

If you’re asking “Why?” The simple answer is “Because instead of hatred for the racist killer, those present inside and outside the church were filled with love for the victims.” As one commentator put it…the dead are now in heaven with God…having died in the church they loved. 

Unlike the media, the church goers were focused solely upon their loved ones.

According to that same commentator, we cannot deny the killer’s ideology of racial hatred. In fact, we should not. We need to face it head on, armed with the ideology of love.

The fact is…evil exists…as does good. The battle will continue as long as mankind does.

If we can learn from the congregation of Charleston’s Emanuel AME, to honor one another with love…

…good will always conquer evil.

………hugmamma.

prejudice thrives…

Sad, but true.

The Civil War which took the lives of thousands of young men, freed colored people from the binds that tied them to their white owners. What the war did not do was erase prejudice from the hearts of whites who held fast to discrimination, and passed it down through their families, generation after generation after generation.

Racial hatred.

Inevitable?

Perhaps the color of a person’s skin signifies the precipice separating one from another because of religion, ethnicity, culture, place of birth.

Perhaps the color of a person’s skin signifies a divide too vast to bridge. 

Perhaps the color of a person’s skin elevates one above the other.

Perhaps the color of a person’s skin is the difference between…heaven and hell.

Perception. Man made. Can be altered. 

…or can it?

………hugmamma.