a role model?…more than

Most of you know of my dear friend Sylvia. From time to time she visits me on the internet, sharing some juicy tidbit sent by her UK network of friends and family. I first wrote of her in my post, “role models, aging gracefully,” dated 8-24-10.

My friend who’s 70ish is admirable not only because she’s such a fashion-plate, which she is, but also because she is laden with health issues that would bring a younger, stronger woman, like me, to my knees. I’m a wuss by comparison. Like an older sister, sometimes a mom, my girlfriend was a smoker for many years, but was finally able to kick the habit. Whether as a result of smoking or having had it beforehand, she continues to suffer with emphysema which is compounded by asthma. Weighing under 100 pounds she’s a lightweight, but she can be as “tough as nails” when debating her opinion. I’ve never tested her, and am not about to try. I’d rather have her in my corner. When a coughing fit overtakes her, she can easily bruise some ribs. As a last resort her doctor prescribes prednisone which eliminates the cough, but leaves my friend with side effects that linger. She has bouts of diverticulitis which has her curled up in great pain. Throughout our 13 years of friendship, she’s been poked, probed, xrayed, cat-scanned, MRI’d more than anyonelse I know. With the help of a physician who’s cared for her, REALLY CARED, my amazing friend always seems “as fit as a fiddle.” I forget her medical history until another episode occurs, and it always does.

I think I dress rather smartly, but when I’m out with my friend and her husband I know she’s outdone me. Not that I mind, for I am simply in awe of  her sense of style, wearing skirts and dresses that I never would, simply because they wouldn’t look as well on me. They’re not my “cup of tea,” but they suit my girlfriend to a tee. And the jewelry, she can wear several gold bangles, rings on several fingers, including on her toes, and of course, earrings. Stunning is the only word to describe her. Whether she’s lounging at home or stepping out, in my estimation, she’s always “dressed to the nines.”

You can continue to read more wonderful things about Sylvia, for there’s definitely more good things to be said about her, by going to the original post mentioned above. I just wanted to give you an inkling of who she is, before you read further. And you’ll want to read further, I guarantee you. Enjoy this little “gem” from Sylvia…

NO CHEATING!!!

I was really surprised to find out who my role was.

DON’T scroll down until you do the SIMPLE math below. It’s crazy how accurate this is!

NO PEEKING!

1) Pick your favorite number between 1-9
2) Multiply by 3, then
3) Add 3
4) Then again multiply by 3 (Go get the calculator…). You’ll get a 2 or 3 digit number
5) Add the digits together

Now scroll down…

With the last number, see who YOUR ROLE MODEL is from the following list:

According to Keirsey, Oprah Winfrey may be a T...

Image via Wikipedia

1)  Bill Clinton
2)  Oprah Winfrey
3)  Jessica Simpson
4)  Sarah Palin
5)  Laura Bush
6)  Hilary Clinton
7)  Ronald Reagan
8)  Ron De Roma
9)  my friend Sylvia
10) Barbara Walters

 

I know. I know. I just have that effect on people. One day, you too can be like me.

P.S. Stop picking different numbers! I AM YOUR ROLE MODEL! Deal with it!!!

now she’s your role model too…gotta love sylvia…i do…hugmamma.

no mystery, off the court…or on

Well, just as I suspected. I’m sure you did as well. “NO PEANUTS!” ordered my doctor, when I saw him a few hours ago. At least not until my “thick” tongue and abnormal throat symptoms disappear. Prescribing Benadryl should the symptoms return, I laughed knowing he’d give me some good old-fashioned remedy, just as he did for the rash on my right eyelid. For that, he told me to apply a dab of non-prescription 1% hydrocortisone ointment. I like my doc, he’s just a regular guy, nothing “fancy schmanzy” about him.     

After typing the final period on my previous post, I noticed my throat slowly starting to constrict once again. Time for playing doctor was over. I needed an expert’s opinion. Fortunately there was a cancellation, if I could hurry myself over to his office in 20 minutes. I said “You bet! I’ll speed.” To which the receptionist laughingly replied “No! Don’t do that.” I laughed back “No, no. Just kidding. I won’t.” And off I went, driving like a bat outta…

The male nurse ushered me into the examining room with a look of surprise. “Weren’t you just here?” I told him I had been there a couple of days ago for my eye, but now it was my throat. “Old age,” I declared chuckling, “I’m falling apart.” We both laughed in commiseration.

Once we were seated in the room, the nurse began telling me about his ailments, a problem ankle and a hip needing replacement. Now mind you, this young man, and I say young because he must’ve been some 15 years younger than me, got my total attention. Listening to his tale, I felt like I had a superficial cut in need of a band-aid. He was injured during his service in the army. When I asked what had happened, he told me I would laugh as others had done. I said I wouldn’t, and I didn’t, because an injury is no laughing matter, however it occurs. In fact, I told him my husband would totally sympathize with him because he’d been in a similar accident. But unlike my husband who waited a couple of years before the injury was really bad and in need of surgery, the nurse’s leg was immediately placed in a cast. He wasn’t ambulatory for some time.

Basketball is not child’s play when you’re up against a guy weighing 209 pounds, or when you’re “pushing” 40 and going up against a college kid. Moms and wives know these things. Why won’t men ever listen to us?

enough said…hugmamma

medical mystery

Preparing  to head to my exercise class, I felt my throat start to constrict. Standing still, I focused upon what was happening inside my mouth. My tongue felt “thick” and slightly swollen. My throat was beginning to exhibit similar symptoms. “Don’t panick. Don’t panick.” I thought. “Calm down. Calm down. Think. Think.”

Feeling like my tongue is “thick” is not new. I’ve felt it for several days, chucking it up to my voracious downing of shelled peanuts for more than a week. Having a few handfuls a day didn’t seem like a crime, although I’m very aware that nuts are high in calories, extremely high. There, you’ve discovered my Achille’s heel.

While I thought the salt intake might be the culprit, a niggling thought sat menacingly at the back of my brain. Because I was drinking water to salve my swollen tongue, was I actually on the brink of moving from pre-diabetes to full-blown diabetes? My common sense said “no,” but the self-diagnostician in me said “might be… could be…you think?”

So I whipped out one of my many self-help books, “The Doctors Book of Home Remedies-Thousands of Tips and Techniques Anyone Can use to Heal Everyday Health Problems” by the editors of PREVENTION Magazine Health Books. It wasn’t a visit to my doctor, but hey, it’d do in a pinch. And I felt my throat starting to “pinch.”

Scrolling down the list of headings under “Asthma,” my eyes fixed upon “Watch what you eat.” Among other things it stated “…foods that trigger asthma are…nuts…” This didn’t register as too worrisome since I’ve never had a problem with them before. Yes, I know, there’s always the possibility my sensitivities can change. As age has crept up on me, so have the countless things I can’t eat or do anymore. But another section did catch my eye.

“Be Salt Sensible.” It maintained that “In a study conducted at the Department of Community Medicine of St. Thomas Hospital in London, researchers discovered that table salt could have a life-threatening effect on your asthma.” They found a strong link between salt purchases and asthma mortality for men and children. “Buying the salt wasn’t killing people; eating it was.” You think my gender might save me? Something to think about. Further down the page, another section peaked my interest.

Use nonaspirin pain relievers.” Allergist Richard Lockey, M.D., director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at the University of South Florida College of Medicine said ” ‘If you have sinusitis and nasal polyps and asthma, I wouldn’t recommend any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory like aspirin or ibuprofen because it could make your asthma worse or even kill you.’ ” Allergist Sidney Friedlander, M.D., clinical professor of medicine at the same college adds “This aspirin sensitivity could just suddenly develop, so it’s best to stay clear of aspirin products altogether,…’ The problem doesn’t happen when you use acetaminophen,…’ ” I don’t know if I have nasal polyps, but I have had chronic sinusitis in the past, and I have mild asthma, so I’m 2 for 3.  Something else to consider.

And finally, the last paragraph “Listen to your lungs.” offered the wisest advice yet. “Of course, the best way to fight an asthma attack is not have one in the first place.” So while  willing myself not to have an asthma attack, I got a second opinion from the best source of all. I phoned my husband, at work, of course. He’s always “on call” for me there.  Himself an asthmatic for many years, I reviewed the mechanics of using my inhalant. Rarely needing it, I had to refresh my memory as to how I should administer the puffs, and how often I could use the inhalant during my episode.

During my “attack,” I had calmly gotten my purse and removed my inhalant, put it to my open mouth, and sucked in my breath while inhaling a quick “puff.” I repeated this a second time. Consulting with others was to confirm what I already knew, including no peanuts (for a while anyway) and cutting back on my salt intake. (Did it contribute to my “thick” tongue?) I’ll have to ponder the aspirin piece. My physician prescribed it as a daily regimen for staving off strokes. Difficult to choose between having an asthma attack or a stroke? Maybe I should ask my doctor?

hmmm, something else to consider…hugmamma