paying homage…to the sun…what else?

Seattle

Seattle (Photo credit: Martin Cathrae)

Here in the Seattle area where the sun doesn’t abide year round, we’re always focused upon its next appearance. So while others may perform rain dances…poor, deranged souls…we close our eyes at night hoping that when next we open them…the sun will have risen in our neck of the woods. So to help it along, I’ve written a song…actually a ditty…hoping the Creator…or Mother Nature…or whoever’s in charge…will take pity.

Thanks for the sun…that lights away the shadows…inside…and out,

its warmth…that blankets all beneath,

making the flowers bloom…the birds chirp,

the children frolic…while the adults tend to chores…outdoors. 

Power-washing the driveway…digging pine needles from the gutters…pulling the weeds and watering the plants. Setting furniture out on the deck.

But what am I thinking???

Forget the tasks…forget the grind…

I’m headed to Molbak’s…where the sun always shines…no matter the weather!

A sip of java…some turkey on foccacia…nibble on a cookie (peanut-butter, of course!)

Gift items…plants…small treasures abound.

So look about you…there’s sunshine everywhere…you’ve just got to find it.

It’s probably hiding…somewhere…inside you!

For it’s no secret…you and I… 

…are the keepers of the sun…

………hugmamma.    🙂

Molbak's Woodinville

Molbak’s Woodinville (Photo credit: burienundressedblog)

Molbak's outdoor eating

Molbak’s outdoor eating (Photo credit: burienundressedblog)

Molbaks' Orchids

Molbaks’ Orchids (Photo credit: JHall159)

you are my sunshine…la, la, la, la…

Looking for the Sunshine

Looking for the Sunshine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

AAAHHH…the sun has come to visit…let’s hope it’s come to stay.

It’s summer after all…or is it?

Here in the Northwest where mountains abound…clouds like to hover.

Sunscreen? Who needs sunscreen…when we’ve got sunblock!

Oh, oh! It’s gone again…or maybe the sun’s just playing hide-and-go-seek.

No time for games…not when the calendar says it’s June 6th.

It’s no fun…when the sun…doesn’t come out to play.

Rain, rain, go away…I only want sun today…and tomorrow…and next week…and next month…

…and for many, many, many more months after that!!!

…pretty, pretty please?…for…

………hugmamma…and her achy knees?   😆

weekly photo challenge: sunsets

From the quiet isolation of my cabin’s veranda on the Queen Mary II, I was indeed lucky to glimpse the setting sun make its slow descent into the vast ocean beyond. I felt special, bearing witness to the magnificence and grandeur of the sun as it traveled on…bringing the dawn of a new day to another part of the world.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

…almost too sacred…to behold………hugmamma.

365 photo challenge: dull

while the skies outside are gray and dull…………………i’ve reason to celebrate

 …..my bff is coming for a visit…..during which there’ll be sunlight and moonlight every day…..because of her………………………………..hugmamma.  🙂

omg…the sun’s out!!!

View of Mt. McKinley of the Denali National Park.

Image via Wikipedia

Here in the Seattle area, the sun rarely comes calling. This winter it’s stayed away even longer than usual. Is it still lazing in the tropical Hawaiian skies, or warming the high elevations of Mt. McKinley, or is it just refusing to pick up and move? If I were only as agile as the young man in Greek mythology, Icharus, I think, who rode his chariot up to lasso the sun, dragging it downward, closer to earth? Or was it a young Hawaiian boy who did that, housing the sun permanently in the dormant volcano, Haleakala? Sometimes too much education can be confusing. Although this particular myth may have its home in both cultures. Will have to check.

Icarus and Daedalus

Image via Wikipedia

 

Being unprepared for such an event, especially when the electricity has been out for about 12 hours, I feel like a kid in a candy shop. I don’t know where to go or what to do first. Too many choices, not enough time before darkness settles in again. What am I saying…it’s always dark around here.

I think I’ll just keep blogging until September when the sun is REALLY here!

an arthritic hawaiian who’s like a “fish out of water”…literally……… …..hugmamma.

Looking into Haleakalā Crater

Image via Wikipedia

redding ct, like the maui of old

When someone learns that I’m from Maui, she always exclaims “Oh, don’t you miss it? Why’d you ever leave?” I take a breath, preparing to answer what I truly feel in my heart.

Maui as it is today, even as it was 15 years ago, is no longer the island of my childhood. As with the neighboring  islands, in fact as with other popular destinations, tourism has transformed what was a less populous, less commercial, off-the-beaten-track locale into a mecca for the rich and famous, and even the not so rich and famous. Mind you, I came to terms with the drastic change some time ago. On one of my last trips to Maui, years ago, it was apparent that visitors to the island provided a livelihood for the majority of the locals. So I wasn’t about to admonish them as co-conspirators in the “ruination” of Maui, while I left to make my living and home elsewhere.

Before my daughter was born, actually before she was even a possibility, I was returning home to Long Island, New York from a business trip to Kansas City. Seated next to me on the flight was an attractive man dressed in cords and a sweater, appearing very much like a New Englander. Striking up a conversation, we spoke of many things.  One of the topics was where we resided. I explained that while my husband and I lived in Westbury, I wanted to move somewhere reminiscent of my birthplace, Maui. I desired the same small town atmosphere, where neighbors knew each other, where children played together, where there were town parades, fairs, picnics. Without hesitation, my traveling companion blurted “Redding, Connecticut! You should move to Redding, Connecticut!” 

I’d never heard of the town, so my new friend proceeded to describe it as a small, rural community isolated from the hubbub of surrounding towns by vast acres of pristine land, much of which belonged to the town ensuring that they would never be commercially developed. He went on to explain that to enter Redding, one either drove alongside reservoirs which supplied water to the town, or along country roads shaded by trees. The idyllic picture seemed lifted from a postcard. Giving me the name of the realtor who helped find this New York City writer a getaway home, I was convinced that my husband and I needed to make the 75 mile trip north of NYC, in search of Redding.

We got more than we bargained for, as a result of our hunt for a new home. Nearly bereft of hope that we’d be parents someday, Redding was the answer to our prayer. After 16 years of marriage, our daughter was born. The first 11 years of her life were spent in an oasis within the midst of suburban Connecticut. Watching her in those early years was like stepping back in time, into my own childhood Paradise. 

Topographically different, Redding had rolling hills, and a man-made lake in which to swim; Maui boasted a dormant volcano, and ocean waves upon which to surf. Redding’s landscape was dotted with sugar maple trees, whose leaves were seasonally transformed into the colors of the setting sun. So unlike Maui’s tropical palms swaying gently in the evening breezes, as the glassy Pacific waters below mirrored the shining  moon overhead.

In spite of their disparities, the people of both Redding and Maui were alike in their hospitality toward newcomers, and the friendliness within their communities. Schools were small, so while students didn’t know everyone personally, they were aware of everyone through friends or others. Children looked forward to trick-or-treating, door-to-door.  School plays were exciting affairs, as were school dances, and basketball games. Sleepovers were commonplace, as were play-dates and church picnics. Dads coached sports teams and led the Boy Scouts; moms were Girl Scout leaders and drove carpools. Children caught buses to school, or walked. Neighbors helped one another; they prepared meals for a family with a cancer-stricken mom; they cared for children when parents were tending to emergencies; they consoled those who laid loved ones to rest.

My daughter’s memories of an idyllic childhood in Redding  are just that, treasured remembrances. And so it is with the Maui of my youth. So when I’m asked “Wouldn’t you want to live there now?” I always reply,  “The Maui where I grew up is in my heart; it’s with me, wherever I am.” I know my daughter feels similarly about Redding, Connecticut, the town she still calls her home, though she’s not lived there for 13 years.

“home is where your heart is,” truly…hugmamma.