“preparedness,” japan’s lesson

Salmon Days

Image by Jeff Youngstrom via Flickr

People in our community volunteer. This is tremendously apparent during the annual Salmon Days Celebration which happens the first weekend in October. And with the increase in floods in recent years, neighbors have been helping neighbors stave off damage, or dig out from under. So it was no surprise when the town established a program where hundreds of citizens were trained to assist “nine firefighters and a handful of police officers and some public works people,” according to the local newspaper.

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) i...

Image via Wikipedia

Our town is very forward-looking, especially in terms of preparing for natural disasters. Besides CERT, Community Emergency Response Team, where members “give critical support to first responders, provide immediate assistance to victims, help suppress small fires and perform light search and rescue,” our city “has spearheaded lessons in Map Your Neighborhood–a program to coordinate disaster recovery on a block-by-block basis and identify special skills, such as medical training, among residents–for dozens of neighborhoods…” With assistance from CERT and Map Your Neighborhood, catastrophic recovery is enhanced. Japan is considered “the most-prepared country with the most-prepared citizenry, and despite that fact, the government can’t reach everyone…”

JogjaEarthquake27Mei2006-4

Image via Wikipedia

Mental preparedness is as crucial as being physically ready, according to the experts.

Stockpiling supplies is crucial, planners said, but residents should also create a plan to reach family members and know the steps to follow if a disaster strikes.

“You can have all of the supplies that you want, but you do need to be mentally prepared for the unexpected…You can get paralyzed if you don’t know what to do at first…So, if you have that plan in place that says,…the first thing I’m going to do is…then you do that…”

 Information regarding a complete emergency kit checklist is available at www.3days3ways.org. General consensus among experts is that the best thing to do to “reduce injury and death during earthquakes” is to “drop, cover and hold.” They find  alternate methods of “standing in a doorway, running outside, and searching for a potential ‘triangle of life‘–as dangerous and not to be recommended.”

Preparing is as easy as 1-2-3 

1. Make a plan – establish an out-of-state contact for all family members to call. Texting can help. Establish meeting place if home is unsafe.

2. Build a kit – 3 day supply of: ready-to-eat food, water (a gallon per person per day), medications and personal hygiene, radio (battery or hand-crank), extra batteries, sturdy shoes and warm clothing, blankets, flashlight, whistle, dust mask

3. Get involved – get to know neighbors. Give key to trusted, nearby friend to watch your property, care for children and/or pets in your absence.

4. Learn CPR.

5. Volunteer in community efforts.

Mt. St. Helen's Eruption 2005

wishing safety in emergencies…hugmamma.